SPINNING WHEELS

Week of June 17, 2002

U.S. drags down yarn output numbers, Strolz reports

Herwig Strolz (L), director general of the International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF), and ITMF Spinners Committee member Andrew Macdonald of Brazil pause for a photo during a break from AYSA’s Marketing Seminar. They had been checking out the Lowe’s Motor Speedway, where Race Week festivities were cranking up, from their vantage point in the Speedway Club.
Photo by Devin Steele

AYSA MARKETING SEMINAR

PART 1

By Devin Steele

HARRISBURG, NC — World yarn production declined for the seventh consecutive quarter to reach a three-year low in the last quarter of 2001, according to Herwig Strolz, director general of the International Textile Manufacturers Federation (ITMF).

Addressing members of the American Yarn Spinners Association (AYSA) during its Marketing Seminar at Lowe’s Motor Speedway here recently, Strolz reported that global yarn output fell by 2.6 percent in the fourth quarter, with the U.S. weighing down the average with its 23.2 percent drop in production. Contrasted with Asia’s 3.9 percent production dip, North America’s yarn production decline was 10.2 percent, he said.

Numbers for the first quarter of this year are still being compiled, said Strolz, who participated in a panel discussion with other members of the ITMF Spinners Committee. Also participating were Jung Soo Kim of Korea, Kenan Koc of Turkey and Andrew Macdonald of Brazil, all of whom provided reports from their respective countries.

ITMF, based in Zürich, Switzerland, is an international association that conducts surveys and studies and publishes materials for use by its members in the worldwide textile industry.

Global sales of textile machinery in 2001 retained some of the momentum from the previous year in the spinning and texturing sectors, Strolz said. However, weaving and circular knitting shipments did not sustain the rebound that occurred in 2000, he added.

Asked during the panel’s Q&A session to predict China’s impact on the world textile arena when quotas are dropped in 2005, Strolz said that China is making necessary preparations. “Overall, what we hear from people who are China investors is, there is less government interference,” he said. “That industry has to find its own ground. But funds for investment are still available from the government.

“China is realizing it must move away from commodities to higher-quality goods.”

Trade talk

AYSA members also heard from David Spooner, recently appointed U.S. Special Textile Negotiator in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. Addressing trade policy, Spooner noted that it is primarily his job and that of Jim Leonard, the former Burlington Industries executive who is now the Commerce Department’s deputy assistant secretary of textiles, apparel and consumer goods, to make sure that promises made by the administration to help the textile industry will be kept.

Several Republican House members from textile-producing states, of course, were given those promises in exchange for their vote for the trade promotion authority measure in December.

“It’s fascinating for me to switch from being on the Hill to the administration and to see the degree to which the administration really feels that it owes the industry and these textile members one, big-time,” said Spooner, formerly a member of NC Congresswoman Sue Myrick’s staff.

Asked afterward if those promises would fall by the wayside after the November elections, Spooner answered, “That’s a very good question and I can only guess, to a certain extent. But I can honestly say that my boss, the USTR, Bob Zoellick, as well as the president himself, are really the kind of folks who believe that the Robin Hayes’s and the Sue Myricks and Jim DeMint’s of the world really took one on the chin for them for a major administration initiative and I don’t think it’s something that will end after November. I think they permanently feel that they owe these folks one.”

The Bush White House has a different attitude regarding trade than previous administrations, Spooner added. Instead of advocating the giving away of quotas, the administration is seeking to encourage some developing countries to diversify economies, he said.

“I read an article in Southern Textile News recently, a reprint of a speech by (Parkdale Mills President) Andy Warlick,” he said. “The big theme of his speech was that the administration has always been unable or unwilling to demand reciprocal market access in trade talks. And to a certain extent, he’s right.

“We’ve had the quota system in place and past administrations have always been very eager to use quotas as carrots to reward countries or entice countries to undertake good behavior. I can honestly say that, despite Pakistan, this has ended. Because of the importance of textiles in domestic politics, particularly domestic trade politics, the administration is hoping to help out members of Congress who get angry about such things.”

Within the context of the quota phase-out, several exporting countries are fighting “tooth and nail” to gain concessions from the U.S. or to get extra unilateral market access in an attempt to gain a competitive edge over their rivals before quotas are dropped in 2005, he said. And some of these countries are threatening to break down on a new round of World Trade Organization talks if the U.S. doesn’t integrate its quotas soon, he added.

“In the last meeting, we argued vociferously with them and required the WTO secretariat to compile an extremely comprehensive list of trade data, the point of which was to show that since 1995, when ATC (the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing) went into effect, the developing world has done extremely well and they have very little to complain about,” Spooner said.

Spooner also wants to prove from that information that it’s not in the best interest of some of these smaller supplies to be pushing for expedited quota integration, he said.

“It just boggles the mind why they’re doing this,” he said. “For one thing they have their preference programs in place and they’re pushing a strategy that will dilute their preferences. Secondly, insofar as China may eat other folks’ lunch after 2005, they’re just advocating an economic strategy which isn’t in their long-term interest.”

DeMint rolls in primary

Week of June 17, 2002

Milliken-backed candidate loses

GREENVILLE, SC — Despite the best efforts of Roger Milliken and other textile leaders to unseat him over his trade record, U.S. Rep. Jim DeMint (R-SC) handily won a Republican primary challenge from Phil Bradley Tuesday.

DeMint gained 62 percent of the votes in the 4th Congressional District, which includes textile hotbeds Greenville and Spartanburg, SC. Milliken endorsed Bradley and sponsored a fund-raiser for him late last month.

Among textile-state lawmakers, DeMint garnered some of the loudest criticism from industry representatives over his December vote for presidential trade promotion authority (TPA). Milliken, chairman and CEO of Milliken & Co., Spartanburg, SC, and others have said that the legislation will lead to more trade deals like the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which they contend have devastated domestic manufacturing.

During the campaign, Bradley tried to cast DeMint as a lawmaker who was out of touch with his constituents. Bradley focused on the House vote, which saw DeMint and a handful of other Southern GOP members switch their votes to support TPA after receiving a list of promises from the White House designed to aid the U.S. textile industry. The measure passed the House by one vote and a different version recently earned Senate approval. A compromise bill is being hammered out.

TPA, formerly fast track, allows the president to negotiate trade deals, with no amendments allowed by Congress.

One of the major promises that encouraged DeMint to change his vote, he said, calls for textiles to be dyed, printed and finished in the U.S. in order to receive duty and quota breaks on shipments, under Caribbean Basin and Andean trade laws. This requirement will save thousands of textile and related jobs, DeMint said. The legislation has since passed the House and is waiting debate in the Senate.

In campaigning, DeMint used the House passage of the measure to demonstrate his support for U.S. textiles. In radio ads, DeMint used a statement issued by the American Textile Manufacturers Institute (ATMI) after the House vote: “The entire United States textile industry owes a debt of gratitude to Congressman Jim DeMint,” said ATMI President Van May.

DeMint had said that Bradley’s portrayal of him was a misrepresentation, that international trade is needed to compete in a global marketplace, as long as protections for American workers are included.

A Greenville Realtor and former five-term state House member, Bradley resigned from the Public Service Commission earlier this year to run against DeMint.

In his bid for a third term, DeMint in November will face Democrat Peter Ashy.

In March, Milliken joined forces with Bruce Raynor, president of the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE), and George Shuster, chairman and CEO of Cranston Print Works, to create a lobbying coalition.

The mission of the American Textile Trade Action Coalition (ATTAC) is “to establish trade policy and other measures necessary for the U.S. fiber, textile and apparel industry to stabilize and grow, thereby preserving and creating critical American manufacturing jobs.”

Included in ATTAC’s legislative agenda is to try to “block detrimental trade legislation such as trade promotion authority,” the group said last month.

Pillowtex

Week of June 17, 2002

Pillowtex appoints Perdue to top posts

GREENVILLE, SC — Despite the best efforts of Roger Milliken and other textile leaders to unseat him over his trade record, U.S. Rep. Jim DeMint (R-SC) handily won a Republican primary challenge from Phil Bradley Tuesday.

DeMint gained 62 percent of the votes in the 4th Congressional District, which includes textile hotbeds Greenville and Spartanburg, SC. Milliken endorsed Bradley and sponsored a fund-raiser for him late last month.

Among textile-state lawmakers, DeMint garnered some of the loudest criticism from industry representatives over his December vote for presidential trade promotion authority (TPA). Milliken, chairman and CEO of Milliken & Co., Spartanburg, SC, and others have said that the legislation will lead to more trade deals like the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which they contend have devastated domestic manufacturing.

During the campaign, Bradley tried to cast DeMint as a lawmaker who was out of touch with his constituents. Bradley focused on the House vote, which saw DeMint and a handful of other Southern GOP members switch their votes to support TPA after receiving a list of promises from the White House designed to aid the U.S. textile industry. The measure passed the House by one vote and a different version recently earned Senate approval. A compromise bill is being hammered out.

TPA, formerly fast track, allows the president to negotiate trade deals, with no amendments allowed by Congress.

One of the major promises that encouraged DeMint to change his vote, he said, calls for textiles to be dyed, printed and finished in the U.S. in order to receive duty and quota breaks on shipments, under Caribbean Basin and Andean trade laws. This requirement will save thousands of textile and related jobs, DeMint said. The legislation has since passed the House and is waiting debate in the Senate.

In campaigning, DeMint used the House passage of the measure to demonstrate his support for U.S. textiles. In radio ads, DeMint used a statement issued by the American Textile Manufacturers Institute (ATMI) after the House vote: “The entire United States textile industry owes a debt of gratitude to Congressman Jim DeMint,” said ATMI President Van May.

DeMint had said that Bradley’s portrayal of him was a misrepresentation, that international trade is needed to compete in a global marketplace, as long as protections for American workers are included.

A Greenville Realtor and former five-term state House member, Bradley resigned from the Public Service Commission earlier this year to run against DeMint.

In his bid for a third term, DeMint in November will face Democrat Peter Ashy.

In March, Milliken joined forces with Bruce Raynor, president of the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE), and George Shuster, chairman and CEO of Cranston Print Works, to create a lobbying coalition.

The mission of the American Textile Trade Action Coalition (ATTAC) is “to establish trade policy and other measures necessary for the U.S. fiber, textile and apparel industry to stabilize and grow, thereby preserving and creating critical American manufacturing jobs.”

Included in ATTAC’s legislative agenda is to try to “block detrimental trade legislation such as trade promotion authority,” the group said last month.

TECHTEXTIL

Week of June 17, 2002

Work with early computers benefitted Jomar founder

PART 5

By Devin Steele

ATLANTA — John C. Blasman became adept at computer technology during part of the industry’s fledgling years, the early 1960s.

Today, he has parlayed that experience as a member of the North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) into a successful enterprise that is benefitting the textile industry.

Blasman is CEO of Cambridge, Ontario, Canada-based Jomar Softcorp International, a company he and his family founded 20 years ago to provide software solutions to the industry.

Today, the company employs about 40 people in Canada and 10 in the United States and counts a number of global textile companies among its customers. Blasman’s three sons and two daughters are involved in the privately held business and his wife recently retired.

Jomar has offices in Cambridge and Charlotte, NC, along with consultants in other areas.

After his work with NORAD, where he coordinated training in newly developed computer technology, Blasman worked for a nuclear steam generator producer. “I learned a great deal about manufacturing there,” he said. “So the first opportunity that came along, my family and I decided to start our own business.”

Blasman, along with one of his sons, company President John A. Blasman, were recently on hand to introduce the company’s products and services to other potential clients during the Techtextil North America trade show here.

“There has been general interest here,” the elder Blasman said on the show floor. “There have also been a half dozen or more people who are definitely interested and we will follow these qualified leads.”

Jomar develops and integrates what it calls E+e (Enterprise + e-business) and collaborative software for manufacturing, distribution logistics and data warehousing with the specialized requirements of industry sectors. Its software delivers server side and Web-based E+e applications integrated with Internet technology.

The company’s software handles “everything from fiber all the way through spinning, warping, knitting, weaving, finishing and dyeing at various stages and also outside commissioning,” Blasman said. “It handles all of these processes and it is fully ERP based.

“It does all the planning, all the costing, all the inventory controls, the purchasing and the distribution sites,” he continued. “And in manufacturing it does finance scheduling on the shop floor and we also have machine scheduling. It has product specifications, it has quality control specs and it tracks every roll of fabric. Either you slit it or you cut it and we can tell what went into it and where it came from, its original rolls. It has excellent tracking from the beginning to the end.”

During the past two years, Jomar has invested heavily in bringing its technology from one platform to multiple platforms, incorporating portable JAVA software with the same look, feel and functionality for a given application, he added.

High marks

Among other exhibitors, Pharr Yarns, McAdenville, NC, touted its Nomex and Kevlar blended yarns that are made for protective wear, as well as flame-resistant aramid fibers used in firefighting gear.

“It’s been a good show for us,” said John Wessinger, sales representative in the High Performance Yarns division. “We’ve seen a lot of our customers within this division, as well as others.”

Pharr’s High Performance Yarns division has been in business about 10 years and has seen continued growth in sales every year, Wessinger added.

An association exhibitor also gave the show high marks.

“This has been a very beneficial show,” said John Y. “Jack” Daniels, executive director of the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC), Research Triangle Park, NC. “It’s a different show than what is normally seen in the U.S. and we have done well here because most of these exhibitors are interested in test methods — testing their high-performance fabrics.

“We’ve had a lot of people acquire about test methods, about membership, about our magazine and about technical programs, so in that regard it’s been very beneficial. We’ve seen a lot of our members and we’ve met a lot of new people.”

Alexander Machinery

Week of June 17, 2002

Alexander Machinery upgrades

MAULDIN, SC — Alexander Machinery, Inc. (Alexco), an original equipment manufacturer of custom-engineered and manufactured machinery for the textiles, nonwovens and agricultural industries, has upgraded its engineering design and services department.

As part of the upgrade, Alexco installed Solidworks Release 2001 and Solidworks Toolbox CAD (computer-aided design) parametric 3-D design software on all of the mechanical design workstations for use in performing the majority of its mechanical designs. Previously, all of Alexco’s engineers designed in 2-D using Autocad R14 and LT.

The company also installed Autocad 2002 and the latest release of Via Schematic on all of its electrical design workstations for use in performing the majority of its electrical designs.

Alexco also upgraded the computer hardware of its mechanical design workstations in order to keep up with memory and video performance demands required of a 3-D design software.

In cooperation with The Print Machine located in Greenville, SC, Alexco provided a special night training program for its mechanical engineers on the Solidworks program. The program covered the fundamentals of the software, advanced sheet metal design functions of the software and the advanced assembly design functions of the software.

Alexco also said it will purchase additional sales and animation tools that go with the Solidworks design package.

On the move

Week of June 17, 2002

Tompkins’ Savage to retire; Rizzo in

SYRACUSE, NY — After leading Tompkins Brothers for more than a quarter of a century, Bill Savage plans to retire this month.

John Rizzo has joined Tompkins, a circular knitting machine manufacturer, as the company’s new president. Savage and Rizzo have been working together during a transition period.

Rizzo, a lifetime resident of Syracuse, is a senior executive with 17 years of experience in leadership, executive operations, executive sales and manufacturing.

Before joining Tompkins, Rizzo served as general manger for McQuay International. Prior to that, he was director of operations for Crouse-Hinds.

Dan River re-elects Williams to board

DANVILLE, VA — The shareholders of Dan River, Inc. have re-elected Richard L. Williams to the board of directors.

Murphy tapped VP at Avondale Mills

GRANITEVILLE, SC — Doug Murphy has joined Avondale Mills as vice president of Avondale Denim.

In this capacity, Murphy will be responsible for all merchandising functions for Avondale’s Alabama and South Carolina denim operations.

Murphy brings to Avondale more than 30 years of experience in the textile, apparel and retail industries, holding management positions at Burlington Industries and Mast Industries.

Museum names Spear advancement director

LOWELL, MA — Ellen Spear has been named director of advancement for the American Textile History Museum.

Spear brings extensive experience in communications and nonprofit management to the position. Prior to joining the museum, she served as vice president of development, marketing and public relations for Concord Family and Youth Services, Inc. in Acton, MA.

Her career began in broadcasting in 1977 with WHPN-AM in Hyde Park, NY. In 1978 she was named program director of Connecticut Public Radio in Hartford. From 1982 to 1988 she was assistant radio manager and program director of WGBH Radio in Boston, then served as cultural centers coordinator for the New Jersey Council on the Arts.

In 1990 she was appointed executive director of the USS Constitution Museum in Boston, and in 1998 became deputy director of Boston’s Computer Museum.

Her experience also includes Web-based production management consulting for Edelman Worldwide and the Town of Andover, MA, as well as serving as program director of the Massachusetts Cultural Facilities Project.

A graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University with a degree in mass communications, Spear also completed a CPB-sponsored Executive Management Business Program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Henderson elevated to BGF president

GREENSBORO, NC — James Henderson has been named president of BGF Industries, Inc.

He replaced Richard Cromer, who has left to pursue other opportunities after serving as president since April 1998.

Henderson has been executive vice president of sales and merchandising since joining the company in 1989. Before joining BGF, he was employed for 31 years with United Merchants and Manufacturers, Inc., where he served as senior vice president, president of the Uniglass division and chairman of the board of its Marglass subsidiary in England.

WestPoint Stevens announces moves

WEST POINT, GA — WestPoint Stevens, Inc. announced that M. Katherine Dwyer has agreed to continue serving as a member of the company’s board of directors and as a member of the board’s Audit Committee. Her second term as director expired on May 8.

Dwyer is chairperson and CEO of SkinKlinic, Inc.

The company also said that two bath products industry veterans have come aboard this month as the company ramps up its drive toward continued product innovation and development, including creation of a bath accessories line.

Gerald Moore has joined WPS as director of bath product innovation and Henny Schlesinger Lakin has stepped in as bath shop design manager.

Moore’s career of more than 40 years has been in the bath product industry, while Lakin has been in the home fashions industry for some 25 years, with a significant portion of that time in fashion bath design.

During the last 25 years, Moore was in bath product development for the Fieldcrest organization of Pillowtex Corp. Earlier, he spent 18 years in bath products with WestPoint Stevens.

He joined Pillowtex in 1977 and moved through assignments that included product development engineer, product development manager and, most recently, director of bath product development. He retired from Pillowtex earlier this year.

He was with WestPoint Stevens from 1959 until 1977 in product development and quality control posts in Towel Operations-South in Valley, AL.

Moore earned a degree in textile engineering form Auburn University.

Lakin most recently was director of licensing/product development with Croscill Home Fashions from 2001 and before that, director of design/engineering for Gifts and Toys with Avon Products, Inc. from 1998.

Earlier, she was vice president of creative services last with Creative Bath Products, Inc., from 1995 and earlier with Dawson Home Fashions from 1992. She was design director for Springs Bath Fashions from 1990 and was associated with other textile-related companies from 1977.

She earned a BA degree cum laude from Queens (NY) College and studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology and at the School of Visual Arts.

In their new posts, Moore will be based at Bath Products Manufacturing Offices in Wagram, NC. Lakin will be in the New York Design Studio.

WestPoint also said that Steven Hoffman, vice president of licenses since September 2001, has assumed additional responsibilities as vice president of marketing services/licenses. Likewise, Nancy Golden, vice president of licensing from April 2001, will have additional responsibilities as vice president of creative services/licensing.

Rigby report

Week of June 17, 2002

Report predicts growth of industrial sector

MANCHESTER, UK — David Rigby Associates has produced an in-depth report that quantifies the global market for fiber and yarn types consumed in technical textiles and nonwovens.

The report, “Technical Textiles and Industrial Nonwovens: World Market Forecasts to 2010,” advises the chemical and fiber industry to expect the technical textiles and nonwovens market to increase by an average of 4 percent per year in volume from now until 2010. This results in a forecast market for fibers and yarns of 23.8 million tons with a value of $47 billion by 2010.

There has been lower growth of 2.1 percent per annum between 2000 and 2002 due to adverse world economic conditions, the firm said.

The report reveals that by 2010 manmade fibers will have increased their share of usage in the technical sector from 77 percent to 81 percent. Inorganic fibers will show the fastest growth (4.5 percent per annum to 2010) and the use of wood pulp will also grow strongly from a low base.

The report also highlights the significant increase in demand for polymer chip to 2010 as nonwovens increase their share of fabric usage (by weight) from 34 percent to 39 percent. This growth will be largely at the expense of woven fabrics, which will in turn force down demand for staple and multifilament yarns, David Rigby said.

The largest application areas for fibers and yarns by value in 2000 are transport, industrial and sports-related products. The fastest-growing sectors up to 2004 are medical/hygiene, geotextiles, building/construction and products used in industry.

Market growth will be strongest in Asia, which will account for 45 percent of the overall market by weight in 2010, compared with 23 percent for Europe and 29 percent for the Americas.

“We believe that this is the first attempt to quantify the global market for fibers and yarns consumed in technical textiles and nonwovens to this level of detail,” said David Rigby, chairman of DRA. “For the first time, we are providing detailed forecasts for the different types of fibers, yarns and final textile products used in a comprehensive range of technical products and end-use applications.”

For more information, visit the DRA Web site www.davidrigbyassociates.com; call +44-161-839-0990; or send e-mail to ttr@dratex.co.uk.

[TC]2

Week of June 17, 2002

[TC]2 plans to ‘size up’ Americans

CARY, NC — [TC]2, Textile/Clothing Technology Corporation, with support from organizations including Land’s End, Levi Strauss & Co., Milliken & Co. and N.C. State University, plans to obtain data to improve the way clothes fit in the U.S. population.

Using [TC]2’s safe white light-based 3-D body measurement technology, scanners will be placed in 10 cities across the U.S. to capture sizing data on 12,000 male and female subjects from 18 to more than 65 years of age.

The anonymous data will then be analyzed and summary results provided to participating organizations for a better understanding of body shapes for use in not only apparel, but also in the automotive, aerospace and furniture industries.

Dissatisfaction with apparel fit is a major issue for shoppers. A comprehensive, valid size and shape survey of the U.S. population has not been done in more than 30 years.

The resulting data analyses from this study will benefit both manufacturers and consumers, [TC]2 said.

[TC]2 developed the methodology for this undertaking after reviewing SizeUK, a similar study just completed in the United Kingdom using [TC]2 scanners, and an analysis by Anthrotech, an organization widely recognized for its expertise in measurement surveys and survey strategy design.

Since 1950, Anthrotech has been involved in numerous anthropometric surveys of U.S. military personnel.

[TC]2 has been a technology developer for more than 20 years. A staff of engineers and scientists complement management with broad industry experience in technology development.

Fiscal notes

Week of June 17, 2002

JPS Industries dips into red ink

GREENVILLE, SC — JPS Industries, Inc. lost $128,000, or 1 cents per share. on sales of $31.9 million in the second quarter.

For the same period a year ago, the company made $1.6 million, or 17 cents per share, on sales of $39.5 million.

“While we would not be satisfied with this quarter’s results over the long haul, we are nonetheless very pleased to have positioned our company to withstand the severely depressed markets that we have experienced now for several quarters,” said Michael L. Fulbright, chairman, president and CEO. “Importantly, our ability to reduce our debt in this environment is most gratifying.”

The company makes extruded urethanes, polypropylenes and mechanically formed glass substrates.

Culp, Inc. chosen for Russell 2000

HIGH POINT, NC — Culp Inc. announced that on a preliminary basis, it has been selected for inclusion in the Russell 2000, one of the major stock market indexes published by Frank Russell Company.

The addition of the company’s shares to the index is scheduled for July 1.

Frank Russell Company, a worldwide investment services firms, calculates and publishes a family of 21 U.S. equity indexes that are widely regarded as important measures of stock market activity. The company employs its indexes in evaluating external investment managers as part of its research-driven investment approach.

C&E loss widens in restatement

TROY, MI — In restating its first-quarter results, Collins & Aikman saw its results widen as it wrote off $40 million of its $1.2 billion acquisition of Textron Inc.’s auto-trim unit.

The write-off widened its loss by $1.4 million, or 2 cents per share, to $7.4 million, or 11 cents per share.

Federal securities regulators had asked the company to give investors more information before selling 20 million shares in a public offering.

Briefs

Week of June 17, 2002

AAFA proposes deal with Material World

The American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) announced its intention to form an alliance with Material World, the international full-package and sourcing event for the sewn products industries.

As part of the proposed alliance, the AAFA will market Material World, promoting the exhibition and its extensive exhibitor base, educational programming and full-package sourcing opportunities, to both its branded apparel members, as well as its supplier members. The AAFA will also have a prominent booth at the upcoming edition of Material World, October 7-9, at the Miami Beach Convention Center.

“As the president of the trade association for the apparel industry, we are delighted to be partnering with the only supplier trade show in the United States held specifically for the apparel industry,” said Kevin Burke, president and CEO of AAFA.

DuPont Ink Jet, Monaco make deal

WILMINGTON, DE — DuPont Ink Jet and Monaco Systems, Inc. announced a joint marketing agreement under which DuPont Ink Jet will license ICC profiles created with Monaco Systems’ software to ship with the DuPont Ink Jet 3210 printer.

This combination will enhance the digital work flow for textile printing provided by the DuPont Ink Jet 3210 printer using the DuPont™ Artistri™ color control & management system (CCMS) and DuPont Artistri ink.

Jarchem Industries receives certification

NEWARK, NJ — Jarchem Industries, an international supplier of specialty and commodity chemicals to the textile industry, announced that it has obtained ISO 9001:2000 Certification.

“ISO-9001:2000 certification is a huge accomplishment for our company,” said Steve Winer, managing director. “Not only does it reconfirm our commitment to quality, it also enables Jarchem to be recognized for its world-class approach to the quality of process and product. ISO certification ensures our manufacturing facilities adhere to the highest standards in product quality and performance and confirms our commitment to our customers.”

The ISO 9001:2000 standard is an internationally recognized quality management system developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The measure assures through independent confirmation that all design, manufacturing and sales processes adhere to this quality standard.

Great Lakes Chemical increases capacity

INDIANAPOLIS — Great Lakes Chemical Corporation announced that an expansion at its manufacturing facility in Pedrengo, Italy, has increased production capacity by 50 percent for its line of Anox™ NDB (No Dust Blend) polymer stabilizer blends.

Separately, the company said that, effective July 1, where contracts allow, the price of Great Lakes BA-59P™ and Great Lakes BC-58™ flame retardants will increase. In addition, the off-list price increase previously announced in Europe, the Middle East and Africa for all grades of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) flame retardants, will now be applied globally, effective June 15.

Shamrock Technologies files patent for PTFE

DAYTON, NJ — Shamrock Technologies filed a patent for a new method of producing nanosized polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

Using this proprietary method, Shamrock can offer fully controlled distributions of PTFE in the submicron range (200-700 nanometers), as well as tightly controlled chemical and physical properties.

The new nanosized PTFE products will be marketed under the trade name NANOFLON™. It is expected that the new NANOFLON products will have expanded applicability beyond the traditional PTFE markets of inks, coatings and lubricants into non-traditional markets such as fibers, polymeric computer chips and agricultural chemicals, to name a few.

Nextec, Dow Corning announce initiative

VISTA, CA — Nextec Applications, Inc. and Dow Corning announced a cooperative marketing initiative to educate consumers, dealers and manufacturers about the advanced performance features of textile encapsulation technology and how these complex features combine to create a “superior” Soft Shell garment.

“The growing success of the EPIC by Nextec® brand, a leading factor in the Soft Shell movement, has created great interest in the U.S. and rekindled interest in Europe for Soft Shell garments,” said Victoria Cabot, director of marketing for Nextec Applications. “And there are very good reasons for our product’s success, one of the most important being our long-standing partnership with our manufacturing partner, Dow Corning.”

SPRING BOARD MEETING

Week of June 17, 2002

NCC’s Hood details farm law challenges

NEW ORLEANS — National Cotton Council of America (NCC) Chairman Kenneth Hood told the organization’s directors that securing the key provisions of new farm law and defending it against unjust criticism are challenges facing the U.S. cotton industry and all of agriculture.

Sens. Charles Grassley (R-IA) and Byron Dorgan (R-SD) have announced their intention to reintroduce an amendment to cut limits, impose direct attribution and eliminate generic certificates, Hood noted in comments at the NCC’s spring board meeting here. Additionally, he said, the industry is “extremely” disappointed with the tone of editorials and reports on the new law that have appeared in a number of major newspapers.

“The challenges to the law will have three basic themes: policy, politics and budget,” Hood said. “The legislative vehicle for amendments will be must-pass appropriations measures not under the direct control of the Agriculture committees.”

Hood said response has been excellent from other commodity and farm organizations to convene a meeting of the Commodity Roundtable in Washington last week to develop a coordinated effort to retain key provisions of the law and to discuss other mutual interest issues. Representatives of the administration and Agriculture committees had asked to participate.

Hood said that with the budget surplus rapidly disappearing, “we can realistically expect amendments to be offered to modify farm programs to generate savings that could be spent on other priorities.”

Another challenge will be for U.S. cotton to find some common ground on at least some core provisions of trade promotion authority (TPA) legislation as the House/Senate conference is expected to begin soon. “There are some major differences between the two bills and the outcome will have very significant implications for the U.S. cotton and textile industries.”

Hood said that, along with international trade policy, foreign market development is a high NCC priority in the years ahead. He said that the new farm law provides additional support for Cotton Council International’s export promotion programs for fiber and U.S.-manufactured products, provided the NCC can keep industry seed money at a level that will enable U.S. cotton to compete aggressively for public funds.

Among other NCC priorities for the near term Hood noted were: 1) utilizing information gathered from NCC members to help in the farm bill implementation process; 2) seeking disaster program funding in future spending measures; 3) participating in the Sound Dollar Coalition to address currency exchange rates and the strong dollar; 4) continuing Quality Task Force activities dealing with pepper trash research, variety selection, sticky cotton measurements and loan schedule improvements; 5) supporting the Bale Packaging Committee’s review of bale cover specifications; and 6) engaging in a number of regulatory issues covering flammability, cottonseed ammoniation, crop protection product registration, air quality standards and biotechnology.

NCC

Week of June 17, 2002

Adams to succeed Lange at Council

NEW ORLEANS — Dr. Gary Adams, director of Crop Program Analysis for the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at the University of Missouri, was named vice president for Economics and Policy Analysis at the National Cotton Council of America.

NCC President and CEO Gaylon B. Booker announced the appointment, which is effective July 1, during the council’s spring board meeting. Adams succeeds Dr. Mark Lange, who will become the NCC’s president and CEO next February upon Booker’s retirement.

As previously announced by industry leaders, John Maguire will be elevated to senior vice president for Washington Affairs in February.

“We are pleased to have a person of Gary’s talent and experience in economics and policy analysis join the Council staff,” Booker said. “His expertise will enable the Council to build on its established procedure of using economic modeling as a powerful tool to help industry leaders develop sound cotton policy as part of government farm and trade programs.”

Booker also announced two additional vice presidential appointments. Fred Johnson was elevated to vice president for Administration and Program Coordination and Bill Norman was named vice president for Ginner Affairs.

Johnson has served as director of Administration and assistant to the president and CEO, while Norman moves from director of Ginner Affairs. He will continue to serve as executive vice president of the National Cotton Ginners Assn. (NCGA). The appointments are effective immediately.

Adams, who also holds an appointment as a research assistant professor for crops in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Missouri, has focused on crops modeling at FAPRI. His responsibilities include outlook and policy analysis for the crops sector, as well as maintaining models for farm income and government costs.

FAPRI is a congressionally enacted institute whose mission is to provide objective analysis of food, agricultural, nutritional and environmental issues.

Adams graduated with a B.S. degree in applied mathematics from the University of Alabama in 1987. He received his M.A. degree in applied mathematics from that institution in 1989 and his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Missouri in 1994.

Johnson, who served as NCC ginner representative and executive vice president of the NCGA prior to assuming his present duties, joined the Council as a field representative in Lubbock in 1979. The graduate of Texas Tech University’s School of Agriculture also held positions as supervisor of Mid-South Field Services and manager of Finance and Program Development.

Norman assumed his present duties at the Council in 2000 following a 14-year career at Continental Eagle Corp., where he achieved the position of vice president before departing to form his own technical consulting company. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University and holds bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in agricultural engineering.

“The addition of Gary Adams and the promotion and realignment of responsibilities among NCC staff strongly positions the Council to continue its leadership role as the central organization of the U.S. cotton industry,” said NCC Chairman Kenneth Hood.

Editorial

Week of June 17, 2002

DeMint survives wingtip treatment

BY EXTRACTING promises from the Bush administration, U.S. House Rep. Jim DeMint found himself also having to extract shoes from his, um, nether region. Those shoes belong to textile executives, union officials and others who believe South Carolina’s 4th District representative turned his back on them on a major trade initiative. And, his being turned in that direction anyway, critics saw an easy target for the wingtip treatment. But they weren’t able to succeed in their ultimate goal: to boot him out of office.

DeMint, of course, became Public Enemy No. 1, at least to many, after he switched his vote to “yea” on the well-chronicled trade promotion authority measure in the House in December. He and several other Southern GOP lawmakers changed their mind after receiving a letter from House leaders on behalf of the administration, helping the legislation eke through the House by one vote. The letter, as we all know, listed pledges from Commerce Secretary Donald Evans that the administration made to aid the ailing U.S. textile industry.

Since then, DeMint and fellow vote-switchers have had heck to pay — perhaps none more than DeMint. This being an election year, he has been caught in the TPA funnel cloud. That vote, more than anything else, made him vulnerable in the eyes of many.

BEING THE SUBJECT of numerous public tongue-lashings, DeMint has said that his intentions are good, that his position has been misrepresented. The South Carolina Upstate, given its international nature, needs trade agreements in order to continue to grow economically and compete globally, and TPA is one way of striking such deals, he has contended. “We’re moving this area in the right direction,” he recently told The Spartanburg Herald-Journal. “We’re building the economy and creating jobs.”

With promises in hand — including the much-ballyhooed dyeing, finishing and printing issue related to the Caribbean Basin and Andean legislation — he cast his vote to help the textile industry, not hurt it, he has said.

Big mistake, according to his critics — most notably Roger Milliken. South Carolina’s wealthiest man, the “Mikey” of trade deals (he hate’s everything), Milliken threw his hat in the ring of opponent Phil Bradley, who had left the Public Service Commission to oppose DeMint. Others, many from the textile industry and its supply chain, lined up behind the Milliken & Co. chairman and CEO, who sponsored a fund-raiser for Bradley and aimed to hold DeMint’s feet over the fire for his TPA vote.

That one vote turned Milliken and like-minded people against DeMint. But that one vote also gained him supporters, or strengthened the resolve of his supporters. Though not as widely circulated through the media, representatives of Springs Industries, Michelin North America and other manufacturers showed up at a recent function to support DeMint. Among those in attendance was Rod Grandy, CEO of Southern Weaving. “Jim has never abandoned the textile industry,” Grandy told The Herald-Journal. “His overall philosophy on trade puts him squarely in line with the broad consensus of most manufacturers in this country.”

WITH BOTH CAMPS maintaining a firm position, DeMint and Bradley squared off in a Republican primary last week. DeMint rolled to victory, with 62 percent of the vote, but managed only just over 50 percent in Spartanburg County, where Milliken & Co. is headquartered. So DeMint will likely remain for a third term, as he is heavily favored to beat his Democratic challenger in the November election.

This battle is virtually over, but the war isn’t, members of the Milliken side hinted last week. North Carolina Republicans who voted for TPA could be the next target of their discontent.

If that’s the case, Robin Hayes, Sue Myrick and Cass Ballenger better put on their padded dungarees.

Textile News Index