IHE

April 28, 2003

Marketing, fashion, technology
to blend at hosiery festivities

  • What: International Hosiery Exposition & Conference
  • When: May 3-6
  • Where: Charlotte Convention Center, Charlotte, NC
  • Conference: May 3
  • Exhibits open: May 4-6,
    9 a.m.-5 p.m

CHARLOTTE, NC — Hosiery professionals and suppliers from around the world will gather this weekend for the International Hosiery Exposition (IHE) and Conference, which will take place for the first time in three years.

The event is scheduled for May 3-6 at the Charlotte Convention Center here.

“The International Hosiery Exposition represents a true blending of fashion, marketing and technology,” said Sally F. Kay, president of The Hosiery Association, owners and producers of IHE. “Attendees from around the globe will have their imaginations piqued by a wide array of fashion marketing concepts — in addition to a diverse range of high-tech, computerized hosiery equipment.”

The conference, under the theme “Hosiery World,” will kick off the festivities on Saturday, May 3. Exhibits will be open Sunday, May 4 through Tuesday, May 6. DuPont Co. will sponsor a fashion show, titled “Team Up For Tomorrow,” on Sunday night.

More than 150 exhibitors are scheduled to show their wares during the exposition.

“I’m excited about the continued advancements in both innovations that will be on display — not only in technology and equipment — but also in the yarns, fibers and packaging,” Kay said. “People are gearing up to see the latest innovations and also for the opportunity to network with peers.”

Some of the new marketing developments on view will include:

• high-performance yarns and fibers. The latest varieties offer such key benefits as heat retention, moisture absorption, odor-control and coolant qualities. Socks produced from these yarns and fibers are suitable for the fast-growing active and progressive sport marketplace.

• seamless body-size apparel. These high-fashion items, produced on what are essentially oversized hosiery knitting machines, result in a totally seamless, comfortable fit for active sportswear usage. Seamless apparel is just right for the gym, aerobics, yoga and the whole range of popular “new age” pursuits.

• cosmetically enhanced hosiery. New finishes and treatments have opened the door to an array of hosiery products that offer dramatically new cosmetic benefits. These include moisturizing pantyhose, anti-cellulite hosiery and figure enhancing legwear.

• ultra-soft socks. Modern technology has produced yarns and finishes that deliver a soft hand for casual and athletic socks. The resulting hosiery offers comfort in active sporting pursuits, as well as in everyday casual settings.

“Manufacturers are saying that the key to being competitive and successful going forward is versatility, because the length of runs may not be the same as what it once was,” Kay said. “So whether it be in patterns or textures or manufacturing processes, the machinery will be conducive for making such products.

“Now more than ever, our industry is taking a proactive stance and being really progressive in listening to what the consumer wants. A lot of the new equipment and technology reflect that.”

Other events

Virtually the entire spectrum of hosiery product — men’s, women’s and children’s socks, sheers, pantyhose and body-size apparel — will be included in the fashion show. Hosiery will be incorporated into a global fashion perspective, in scenes ranging from active sports to elegant business settings to sophisticated evening wear. The runway event will be preceded by a reception and dinner.

“This will be the unquestionable social high point of our industry calendar for the year,” said Kevin Toomey, chairman of The Hosiery Association and president and CEO of Golden Lady/Kayser-Roth.

The “Hosiery World” Conference, meanwhile, will provide hosiery executives with tools to compete in the emerging global economy, Kay said. “In a single day, participants will be able to gain a complete overview of all of the complex forces at work in the worldwide marketplace.”

Following opening remarks by Kay and Toomey, the conference will provide an in-depth look at the key marketing issues confronting the industry, including:

• global market trends. A worldwide overview of the hosiery industry will be provided by experts Neil Hightower, vice president, and Gian Mario Borney, director of international marketing, of Werner International.
• global hosiery trade. Major trends in world trade, together with an update on regional initiatives, will be addressed by David Spooner, U.S. chief textile negotiator.
• automation and logistics. The establishment of “people-less” hosiery manufacturing plants will be the topic of remarks by Barry Mademann, partner, The Context Group.
• international sourcing. The key elements of domestic and international sourcing will be addressed by Bill Sheely, executive VP/Operations, Gold Toe Brands, Inc.|
• retail perspective on a global market. Consumer and retail trends in the global marketplace will be the focus of the keynote presentation by Marshal Cohen, co-president of NPD Fashionworld.
• executives view the hosiery world. A panel of key hosiery executives from around the globe will discuss their unique viewpoints on the industry.

“Attendees at the ‘Hosiery World’ Conference will emerge with a greater understanding of how worldwide market developments will impact their businesses in the months and years ahead,” Toomey said. “This is an invaluable opportunity for our industry to gain a decisive edge in the increasingly competitive global hosiery marketplace.”

IHE

April 28, 2003

Communications Partnership paying dividends

On February 26, millions of consumers across the United States learned how sheer hosiery can be an effective and affordable way for working women to upgrade their workplace wardrobes.

The message, delivered by fashion expert Katlean deMonchy, was particularly poignant given the growing trend toward more formal attire in corporate America.

The television segments promoting sheer hosiery that day reached more than one-third of the top 25 U.S. markets, including New York, Chicago, Dallas, Atlanta and Minneapolis. In total, more than 125 markets received the feeds. Average cost per market? $76.

The broadcast was one element of an aggressive consumer education campaign supported by the Sheer Hosiery Communications Partnership, which is funded and cooperatively managed by 10 leading companies in the sheer hosiery marketplace. The partnership is under the auspices of The Hosiery Association (THA), but is independently run by a board of its supporters.

DuPont Textiles and Interiors, Kayser-Roth, Sara Lee Hosiery and Unifi have been the backbone of the program for almost 10 years. Other current supporters are Acme-McCrary, Bayer, Commonwealth Hosiery, Danskin/Pennaco, Phantom USA and the Virkler Company.

“The Communications Partnership is an important and efficient way for the sheer hosiery industry to reach consumers,” said Kevin Toomey, chairman of The Hosiery Association and president and CEO of Golden Lady/Kayser-Roth, whose company has been a long-term supporter. “It would be difficult for any one company to underwrite this consumer education effort alone but, by working together, we’ve proven we can make a significant impact.”

High ROI

The partners unanimously agree that there is a high return on their investment in the program. It makes consumer outreach affordable by spreading the cost among companies, they said. Media are receptive because the partnership’s messages promote the sheer hosiery category and not individual brands. Finally, the program is successful in balancing potentially negative stories with positive hosiery messages, they added.

“Our goal is to continually educate consumers about technology advances and new products so they will buy more sheer hosiery more often,” said Barb Johnson of Sara Lee Hosiery, who currently chairs the Communications Partnership. “We want to consistently convey that the sheer hosiery industry listens to women and provides them with the best possible products to meet their needs.”

Consumers reached

The Communications Partnership’s 2002 program reached more than 160,000,000 sheer hosiery consumers with its messages. Johnson said she aims to raise the bar higher this year. The highly successful television broadcasts in February got things off to an impressive start and she said she is enthusiastic about the other elements of the 2003 program.

A Runway Report previewing fall 2003 sheer hosiery fashions was recently sent to leading fashion editors at more than 200 newspapers, wires, syndicates and fashion magazines. Previous Runway Reports have been highly successful in generating positive publicity for sheer hosiery and Johnson said she expects even more success this year. A second Runway Report will be issued in the fall.

The partnership continues to take advantage of and accelerate the trend to more formal workplace attire. Early this month, 200 fashion reporters around the country received a comprehensive press kit focusing on sheer hosiery as an important element in workplace fashion. The material will be recast as an article on sheer hosiery products for working women that will be sent to 10,000 weekly newspapers.

Later this year, a radio news release on sheer hosiery will be produced and distributed to 2,500 stations across the country. It will feature The Hosiery Association President Sally Kay, who is increasingly viewed as an important spokesperson on fashion and hosiery.

Kay will also be involved in regular, targeted briefings with top-tier media. Included will be as many as 30 key consumer television reporters, as well as syndicated fashion editors. Last year, briefings by Kay with top-tier editors reached more than 10 million consumers, including her briefing with the Associated Press, which ran in countless newspapers across the country.

The Communications Partnership will tailor some of its messages this year to reach important growth markets such as Hispanic and African-American women. It will rely on mediums such as CNN Espanol, Latina and Black Entertainment Television to reach them.

Maximizing potential

The ability of the partners to maximize the potential of the consumer education program is directly related to the number of companies that support it. After almost a decade of success, the partnership is eager to enlist more supporters.

“We have always been one of the major supporters of this program because we believe in helping the industry, as well as ourselves,” says Bill Amadio, business manager, North America Legware, DuPont Textiles and Interiors. “If more companies could find a way to throw their support behind this communications program, we could accomplish even more.”

Sara Lee’s Johnson emphasized that there is room at the table for smaller firms, as well as the larger ones. Companies such as Danskin/Pennaco, Acme-McCrary and Virkler regularly participate in planning meetings, she pointed out, and have an important impact on program direction.

“I listen a lot when I attend Communications Partnership meetings because I have so much to learn,” Craig Virkler, Virkler Company president, said with a laugh. “Yet I’m a full-fledged member of the team and there always seems to be an opportunity for me to contribute to the process.”

The bottom line, he said, is that everyone involved in the sheer hosiery industry should be working together to rekindle its fortunes. For companies looking to help make a difference, the Sheer Hosiery Communications Partnership is a perfect place to start.

IHE

April 28, 2003

PAF Sales/BTSR to show systems for yarn control

In booth #1436 at the International Hosiery Exposition in Charlotte, NC, BTSR International will be displaying a number of items. The company is represented by PAF Sales in the U.S.

Among products the company will demonstrate:

• the SMART64HS Yarn Monitoring System, which is interfaced with the non-contact IS3W/HS Motion Sensor and the AST/C Tight End Detector. This system is normally sold to hosiery manufacturers who desire to reduce knitting waste by 50 –75 percent on all types of knitting machines, according to the manufacturer;

• IS3N/TS Thread-Break Detection Sensors with all types of unique accessories. These sensors are sold to pantyhose manufacturers who need thread-break detection on their knitting and sewing machines. Accessories include various tensioners and yarn guides; and

• the SMARTKTF2000 Consumption Monitoring System, which is interfaced with the revolutionary KTF/100HP Feeder Unit. This system is normally sold to hosiery and seamless manufacturers who want to guarantee stitch cam uniformity, as well as a knowledge of yarn consumption per garment. Due to the unique patent of the system, users are able to learn yarn consumed per garment controlling each garment +/- 10 percent.

BTSR International will show for the first time the following system:

• the SMDIN-RW Feeder Control System interfaced with the KTFMF Micro Feeder. This system is set to revolutionize both sock and pantyhose elastic yarn feeding systems.

Also in the booth, representatives of PAM Trading Corporation, a full-service equipment supplier to the hosiery industry, will be on hand.

PAM Trading will highlight its large selection of replacement parts for an extensive range of machinery.

Additionally, the company will showcase some of the high-quality, reconditioned equipment from its inventory. The PAM 2000 high speed, semi-automatic transfer printing machine will also be on display.

Sales and technical representatives will be available to discuss any new or reconditioned equipment needs.

Additionally, PAM sales staff will be located in the booths of the following suppliers the company represents: Matec — knitting machinery, including Solis automated sewing and handling equipment; Cortese — boarding and packaging equipment; Rosso — seaming and turning machines; José Valeri Homs — regenerated optic white cotton yarns; and Texplan — regenerated colored cotton yarns.

PAF Sales and PAM Trading Corporation are headquartered in Greensboro, NC. BTSR (Best Technologies Study & Research) is the Italian company known for its advanced yarn control systems and stop motions.

IHE

April 28, 2003

Nylstar to feature Meryl Skinlife fiber

GREENSBORO, NC — Nylstar, Europe’s leading textile nylon filament producer and a growing force in North American fashion, will highlight Meryl® Skinlife, its innovative new nylon odor-control fiber, at the International Hosiery Exposition May 4-6 in Charlotte, NC.

The company will exhibit in booth # 1510.

According to Nylstar, Meryl Skinlife brings several unique qualities to the sock and hosiery markets:

• it is the world’s only bacteriostatic fiber, with technological advances that inhibit bacteria growth in fabric and maintain the body’s natural balance of bacteria on the skin, Nylstar said. This differentiates it from typical anti-bacteria fibers, which kill both good and bad bacteria;

• its odor control agent will never migrate to the skin or wash out because it is inherent in the yarn, the manufacturer added; and

• it combines these state-of-the art fiber advances with the light weight and soft hand of a microfiber, the firm noted.

“Skinlife is the result of extensive worldwide research to learn what benefits consumers want in their apparel,” said Dina Dunn, vice president of marketing at Nylstar. “We’re eager to highlight it at the IHE show because Skinlife contains all of the pluses consumers typically look for in odor-control products and none of the minuses.”

Nylstar will begin production of Meryl Skinlife at its Martinsville, VA, plant this summer. The Martinsville plant has been designated the company’s global “center of excellence” for producing specialty products. It features the most technologically advanced spinning equipment in commercial operation, Dunn added.

Founded in 1994 as a joint venture between Snia and Rhodia, Nylstar is a global leader in producing nylon 6 and nylon 6,6 fiber and its Meryl® family of yarns is among the most versatile in the textile marketplace, according to the company.

Headquartered in Cesano Maderno, Italy, Nylstar produces nylon at nine plants and employs more than 4,500 people worldwide.

IHE

April 28, 2003

Nilit to exhibit Sensil collection

NEW YORK — Nilit Ltd., the Israeli-based manufacturer of nylon 6.6 fibers for fashion legwear, intimate apparel and bodywear, will be exhibiting new Sensil® collections and products, including Sensil® EverSheer and Sensil® Cupelle at the International Hosiery Expo in Charlotte, NC.

Nilit’s show booth will demonstrate how the company is “Fashioning the Future with Nylon” through innovative products. The collection can be visited at Nilit’s booth #1108.

A special brunch entitled “The Art of Sensil,” featuring artistic displays of the new Favardi and other collections, will take place on Monday, May 5 by invitation. The special exhibit and brunch will feature artistic displays of Sensil fabrics and the Favardi Seamless Collection.

Brunch will feature exotic Israeli dishes from the “Israeli Brunch” cookbook by renowned food editor Nira Rousso. Attendees will receive the cookbook as a gift.

“The exhibit demonstrates our support of the hosiery industry by developing new products that will keep the marketplace exciting,” said Mac Cheek, president of the U.S. based Nilit office. “We are looking forward to the special brunch and exhibiting the latest Sensil collections.”

The Nilit booth will showcase the launch of Sensil EverSheer, a modified nylon 6.6 yarn used for covering and protecting spandex. Due to its unique properties, the nylon embraces the spandex tightly, creating a highly uniform appearance, a luxurious and smooth, caressing feel. Sensil EverSheer will also be known for its unique ability to resist snags and picks.

“Sensil EverSheer is Nilit’s latest addition to the innovative line of advanced Sensil yarns. This specially engineered fiber was designed for the sheer hosiery market, and is used to create pantyhose that gives a fine sheer appearance that compliments all women,” said Molly Kremidas, merchandising manager for Nilit.

Sensil Cupelle integrates two newly designed polymers that achieves two distinct colors in one regular dying process, according to the company. When Sensil Colorwise and Sensil Pastelle are knitted

together in any design, the result is a combination of two distinct, even contrasting colors. The sophisticated concept was invented at Nilit to meet the need for high fashion, multicolored knitted products at more affordable costs.

“Fabrics created with Sensil Cupelle also cater to the preference among Nilit’s clients for stripes, colored patterns,

inscriptions or segments and for two-tone, piece-dyed

jacquards,” Kremidas said. “Adding other yarns to the knitted fabrics allows for more than two colors in the same dyeing process, reaching a greater variety of design.”

A new Favardi seamless bodywear collection will also be introduced at the exhibit. The Favardi studio in Italy specializes in creating unique products for mass production on a variety of equipment, including Santoni machines.

In addition, Nilit will introduce a new sock collection with Sensil fibers.

Nilit Ltd. is based in Israel and has offices in Italy, the U.S., France and South America.

IHE

April 28, 2003

Nilit to exhibit Sensil collection

NEW YORK — Nilit Ltd., the Israeli-based manufacturer of nylon 6.6 fibers for fashion legwear, intimate apparel and bodywear, will be exhibiting new Sensil® collections and products, including Sensil® EverSheer and Sensil® Cupelle at the International Hosiery Expo in Charlotte, NC.

Nilit’s show booth will demonstrate how the company is “Fashioning the Future with Nylon” through innovative products. The collection can be visited at Nilit’s booth #1108.

A special brunch entitled “The Art of Sensil,” featuring artistic displays of the new Favardi and other collections, will take place on Monday, May 5 by invitation. The special exhibit and brunch will feature artistic displays of Sensil fabrics and the Favardi Seamless Collection.

Brunch will feature exotic Israeli dishes from the “Israeli Brunch” cookbook by renowned food editor Nira Rousso. Attendees will receive the cookbook as a gift.

“The exhibit demonstrates our support of the hosiery industry by developing new products that will keep the marketplace exciting,” said Mac Cheek, president of the U.S. based Nilit office. “We are looking forward to the special brunch and exhibiting the latest Sensil collections.”

The Nilit booth will showcase the launch of Sensil EverSheer, a modified nylon 6.6 yarn used for covering and protecting spandex. Due to its unique properties, the nylon embraces the spandex tightly, creating a highly uniform appearance, a luxurious and smooth, caressing feel. Sensil EverSheer will also be known for its unique ability to resist snags and picks.

“Sensil EverSheer is Nilit’s latest addition to the innovative line of advanced Sensil yarns. This specially engineered fiber was designed for the sheer hosiery market, and is used to create pantyhose that gives a fine sheer appearance that compliments all women,” said Molly Kremidas, merchandising manager for Nilit.

Sensil Cupelle integrates two newly designed polymers that achieves two distinct colors in one regular dying process, according to the company. When Sensil Colorwise and Sensil Pastelle are knitted

together in any design, the result is a combination of two distinct, even contrasting colors. The sophisticated concept was invented at Nilit to meet the need for high fashion, multicolored knitted products at more affordable costs.

“Fabrics created with Sensil Cupelle also cater to the preference among Nilit’s clients for stripes, colored patterns,

inscriptions or segments and for two-tone, piece-dyed

jacquards,” Kremidas said. “Adding other yarns to the knitted fabrics allows for more than two colors in the same dyeing process, reaching a greater variety of design.”

A new Favardi seamless bodywear collection will also be introduced at the exhibit. The Favardi studio in Italy specializes in creating unique products for mass production on a variety of equipment, including Santoni machines.

In addition, Nilit will introduce a new sock collection with Sensil fibers.

Nilit Ltd. is based in Israel and has offices in Italy, the U.S., France and South America.

IHE

April 28, 2003

McMichael Sapona Mkt. to showcase new yarns

MADISON, NC — McMichael Sapona Marketing announced several new developments especially for hosiery and sock makers, which it will be displaying at the IHE in booth #1504.

Sapona is the exclusive U.S. supplier of Tactel® Illuminae flat drawn yarns available in 20, 40 and 70 denier counts. The bright trilobal fiber is made from nylon 66 cationic dyeable polymer.

Tactel illuminae enables the creation of a wide variety of bi-lustre or bi-color designs in one dye bath for iridescence, marls and patterns, especially when used in conjunction with other yarns. The flat yarn is also available black twisted, air-covered or double covered with Lycra®.

Also, McMichael Sapona now offers high-stretch, knit-deknit (KDK) dyed yarns available in a wide range of custom colors. KDK yarns are textured and twisted yarns processed on a single-end circular knitting machine, scoured or dyed and subsequently unraveled by deknitting and winding. Currently available in 50 and 70 denier multi-plies, the KDK yarn is particularly useful in knitted items that need very high stretch and recovery, or highlighted embroidery.

McMichael Sapona will also show several seamless samples, including Nylstar Skinlife bacteriostatic microfiber nylon. Other new products include polyester/cotton air-entangled heathers, 20 denier Lycra air covered with a wide choice of set or stretch polyester and nylon 6, or 66 filament fibers and two-ply 50/17 twisted set nylon on cones or tubes.

Stretch yarns for seamless and soft socks will also be shown, including air covered 70/68, 70/92 microfibers and 140/96 bright nylon 66.

McMichael Sapona is the new sales team of McMichael Mills and Sapona Manufacturing. The combined sales effort for the two companies provides customers with a broad product line of stretch yarns for textured nylon to conventional covered spandex.

Both companies are now able to marshal more vertical capacity to meet customer needs and command better service from a common supply chain. The manufacturing facilities are Lycra® Assured yarn processors offering the latest in fiber developments with a variety of air tack, oil treatment and package delivery properties.

GTMA Annual Meeting

April 28, 2003

Gardner has helped cultivate group’s growth

GTMA Chairman Tom Gardner said his experience as president of the North Carolina Textile Manufacturers Association in 1994-95 provided him with an understanding of issues that affect a company’s bottom line and provided him experience in meeting and discussing issues with legislators and state officials.
Photo by Molly Laster/Springs

Editor’s note: Following is a phone interview conducted by STN Editor Devin Steele with Tom Gardner, chairman of GTMA: The Association of Georgia’s Textile, Carpet and Consumer Products Manufacturers, and senior vice president of Bath Manufacturing at Springs Industries, Griffin, GA; and Roy Bowen, GTMA president. The group holds its annual meeting May 3-6 at Sea Island, GA.

STN: What were your goals when you became chairman and how did you go about meeting them?

Gardner: The leadership of the association was committed to ensuring that the mission of GTMA continued to be fulfilled. That mission, which is set forth in the mission statement, is that GTMA is to bring a unique value to the member companies, which contributes to their profitability in a globally competitive marketplace. And we accomplished that mission through the association’s committees, each of which was chaired by an outstanding leader and which included committed and knowledgeable committee members.

Another goal was to increase our active and associate membership, which we have done. We also wanted to provide GTMA members with value-added meetings, seminars and programs during the year.

GTMA provided more value to our members than it costs to belong to GTMA.

Bowen: That is a commitment that GTMA makes, to return more in value to its members than the members invest in GTMA. And Tom certainly ensured that that commitment was upheld this year.

STN: Tom, you’ve now held the top revolving position at two statewide textile-related organizations. What did you learn from your experience as president of the North Carolina Textile Manufacturers Association in 1994-95 that you brought to this post?

Gardner: Having served the NCTMA provided me with an understanding of issues that impact a company’s bottom line, which we as manufacturing executives do not deal with on a regular basis, and gave me experience in meeting and discussing these issues with legislators and state officials. I also learned in North Carolina for an association to be successful, it must have committed and knowledgeable committee chairman.

STN: Would you like to relate any memorable moments or interesting anecdotes from your one-year term?

Gardner: I had and enjoyed the opportunity to meet with governors, lieutenant governors, legislative leaders and people throughout the state to talk with them about the textile and the carpet industry in Georgia. I’ve learned how much GTMA is really respected as an organization in Atlanta and throughout the state.

STN: Why was it important to you to serve in such a leadership capacity?

Gardner: I’m keenly aware of the value of the state textile associations. GTMA plays an important role in helping to ensure the competitiveness of the textile and carpet industry. I am aware of the many good things that GTMA does provide the industry and I wanted to become more active in the leadership of the organization.

Bowen: GTMA is generally regarded as having a very high profile at the State Capitol and within state government and Tom helped sustain that high profile and the financial viability of the association.

STN: The Alabama Textile Manufacturers Association became part of a larger manufacturing coalition last year — joining North Carolina and South Carolina as state organizations that grew through broader membership. That leaves GTMA as the only exclusive textile and related state group left in the industry. Given the trend, I have to ask this question again this year: Does GTMA ever see itself becoming part of a more broad-based manufacturing group or opening its ranks to “other” members?

Gardner: GTMA has a large enough membership to support a trade association that focuses on the legislative and regulatory needs of the textile and carpet industry.

Bowen: We did change our name at our 100th anniversary meeting (in 2000). We kept “GTMA” because it’s such a recognized moniker. But we broadened the name to “The Association of Georgia’s Textile, Carpet and Consumer Products Manufacturers,” so that does provide the possibility to bring people in beyond traditional textiles and carpet. We’re still the largest manufacturing employer in the state, with nearly 95,000 employees and it is an industry that’s worthy of its own trade association and can support its own trade association.

We have, however, helped to spread the cost of some of our involvement in the energy area to those who benefit by our efforts. We formed a Coalition of Georgia Business for Sound Energy Policy and we solicited financial participation of companies outside the industry that benefit from our work and expertise in the electricity and natural gas areas.

STN: Has that been successful in terms of involvement?

Bowen: Yes. We have a fairly sizable budget for energy matters and we’ve been able to supplement that to the tune of perhaps 20 percent with companies outside our industry that have a real interest in what we’re doing in natural gas and electricity before the Georgia Public Service Commission and the Georgia General Assembly.

STN: Job losses were common throughout the manufacturing sector in 2001, and Georgia certainly wasn’t immune to that trend. Over the course of the last year or so, was there any abatement in job loss figures in your state, particularly in the textile, carpet and consumer products sectors?

Gardner: The job losses in Georgia are probably not as steep as they were in other states, and that is partially because the carpet industry has been a little more stable during the past year. Our employment has leveled off to about 95,000 in the textile and carpet industry.

STN: Has GTMA’s membership ranks increased, declined or stayed about the same as a year ago? Why, in your estimation?

Gardner: Our membership during the past year has grown about 10 percent. We are pleased by this result, which is a testament to the successes that GTMA has registered for the industry. During a time when the textile industry did not have an outstanding year, that makes a bold statement about what we do as an organization.

Bowen: I expect membership to continue to grow this year and we expect several companies that for a variety of reasons had dropped their membership will rejoin during the coming year as they get their financial houses back in order.

As Tom indicated, these companies see the value that they get in GTMA membership. We can point to bottom-line savings for them in the areas of our Worker’s Compensation Self-Insurance Fund and energy, for instance, and in legislative areas.

And I think our members understand that there’s no such thing as a free ride. Unless we have the financial wherewithal to weigh in and be active with the Public Service Commission and the General Assembly, we won’t register the kind of successes that we’ve become accustomed to. And then everybody loses. But if everybody participates and pays their fair share, then everybody benefits.

GTMA has to prove itself every day, just as our member companies have to prove themselves every day in the marketplace. As long as GTMA can prove itself in the marketplace, we believe that the industry will support this association.

STN: What were some of the group’s “successes” during the past year?

Bowen: We had very favorable decisions by the Public Service Commission dealing with surcharges that were to have been levied on interruptable consumers of natural gas. And hopefully soon we’ll register a very significant victory on a sales tax issue dealing with the valuation of carpet samples. That clears up a dispute between the industry and the Georgia Department of Revenue that has the potential of several millions of dollars in savings to carpet companies.

Through our Workers’ Compensation Self-Insurance Fund, we’ve distributed nearly $1 million in dividends back to our member companies. The reactivation of the Workers’ Comp Fund is very important.

Another success is the continuing unfolding of the Textile and Carpet Academy, through the auspices of the Department of Technical and Adult Education, whereby training is provided to hourly employees and first-line supervisors at the plants, at no cost to these companies. Companies are able then to use dollars that otherwise had been earmarked for training either to enhance their training or to invest in technology, which enhances their competitiveness.

Also, in a time when there have been severe budget cutbacks in the state, the governor and the House and Senate leadership have continued funding for CCACTI, the Consortium for Competitiveness in the Apparel, Carpet and Textile Industries. This is where we use state dollars to leverage the expertise of our research universities on applied research to deal with competitiveness issues identified by the industry. The idea is to bring this applied research to bear on competitiveness issues very, very quickly.

STN: What are some of the other legislative/regulatory issues or concerns GTMA dealt with this year?

Bowen: Another major legislative priority for GTMA was improving the state workers’ compensation statute. The bill passed and will be signed by the governor.

We’ve also been instrumental in bringing about needed changes in Georgia’s unemployment insurance law, so that employers wouldn’t be burdened with a hefty surcharge that could have resulted upon the expiration of the moratorium on the collection of unemployment insurance taxes.

STN: What are the bright spots in the textile/carpet industry in Georgia?

Gardner: One of the bright spots I see is the continuing investment by companies in the industry to keep ourselves modern and competitive worldwide.

Another bright spot is the investments made by people like Warren Buffett in Shaw Industries and Fruit of the Loom and David Stockman in Springs.

Bowen: These are very astute investors who see the great upside potential of the domestic industry. They see the quality of the product that’s produced and they recognize the proximity-to-market advantage.

STN: What else “exciting” is going on within the organization?

Bowen: Tom touched on this, but the high regard that this association is held by the governor and members of the General Assembly, particularly the leadership, puts the association in a position to help with policy formulation. That is beneficial not only to the industry but to the state’s economy.

STN: What are the biggest challenges facing the textile/apparel/carpet industry, particularly in Georgia, in the coming years?

Gardner: I think one of the biggest challenges for the textile, apparel and carpet industry is that we have to be competitive and think competitive worldwide. Our competitors are not just domestic companies. Our competitors now are China, India, Pakistan, South America, etc. And we have to prepare to deal with this competition by remaining modern and sourcing strategically. We also have to find ways to reduce costs to remain competitive.

Also important is that GTMA continues to present Georgia as the best state for textile organizations. We have a skilled work force and a state government that is willing to work with business to become more competitive.

Bowen: My desire is that Georgia be regarded as the very best state in terms of business investment in textiles and carpet and GTMA’s efforts are directed to ensure that Georgia remains the most attractive state in which the industry should invest.

STN: Tom, please describe the working relationship you have with your officers and board and the GTMA staff.

Gardner: It’s been great. We’re fortunate to have Roy’s leadership and his staff representing the industry in Atlanta. The textile industry was developed in Georgia around family investment. Even though that has changed over the years, GTMA has continued to operate with a sense of family values. It has not diminished through the years. It’s a close-knit organization and so is the working relationship among the officers, board and staff.

We’re very proactive in the legislative area and all of the officers, the board and the staff understand the mission and the goals of the organization and work together as well as any organization I’ve ever been associated with. It takes a strong, team effort to accomplish the things this organization does.

STN: Please comment on the leadership skills of Bill Barron, your expected successor, and the fact that he will become the first representative from the carpet manufacturing sector to hold the chairman’s post?

Gardner: Bill is very intelligent, politically astute and a skilled leader. He understands the role and value of the association and the industry’s positions and will do an excellent job of representing the industry.

STN: Tom, how long have you been a member of GTMA?

Gardner: I’ve been involved personally for seven years, since I moved to Georgia, but Springs has been involved for many years.

STN: How has GTMA helped you grow professionally?

Gardner: You get exposure to a whole new set of issues and people that broadens your perspective. In addition, serving in a leadership position provided me the opportunity to become better acquainted with industry leaders to see how they operate as well as to meet elected officials.

Bowen: Dealing with elected officials takes a little bit different skill set than dealing with the corporate world and Tom has done a wonderful job in representing GTMA and the industry to our elected officials and regulators.

STN: Please update us on the GTMA’s Executive In Residence Program. John Boland III has served in this capacity since its inception a couple of years ago. Is this a rotating position?

Bowen: John has done an exceptional job as the first GTMA Executive In Residence. We first conceptualized this position bringing real-world experience to the classroom. We also believed it beneficial to rotate senior executives in the textile or other industries through the Executive in Residence, holding the position for a year, maybe two at the most. But John has done an outstanding job in this position for three years.

John will be rotating out of the position at the end of June. We’re now in the process of selecting another Executive In Residence to succeed him.

The value is evident to all of our companies, so much so that they have invested in it.

Gardner: It is an important position for the entire industry and Springs is one of the companies that has supported it financially. As Roy said, one of the purposes is to keep fresh, new ideas to students enrolled in the textile degree programs at Georgia Tech and Southern Poly. I’ve had the opportunity to meet with and interview students majoring in textiles at Georgia Tech and they unanimously support and have encouraged the textile and carpet industry to continue to support the Executive In Residence program. It gives them someone there with a whole lot of experience who they can talk to about their anticipated profession.

STN: Can you update us on

the accomplishments of the Textile Education Foundation during the past year?

Bowen: There are a number of initiatives being considered now at Georgia Tech and Southern Poly related to the future of the textile degree programs. We are particularly excited about the potential for a closer alignment between the Textile School at Georgia Tech and the Dupree College of Management. We’re working to bring that about.

At Southern Poly, the foundation, along with the Apparel Foundation, is studying the creation of a Center of Excellence in Softgoods Design, Manufacturing and Distribution. We’re in the initial stages of both of these initiatives. There’s real potential at both institutions to provide tremendous benefit to this industry.

STN: Please discuss the theme you picked for this year’s annual meeting — “GTMA — Leading ... Serving.”

Gardner: GTMA leads the industry through its lobbying efforts in Atlanta and through its committees. In addition to that, GTMA members are certainly leaders in the industry and in their communities. In the same vein, GTMA also serves its members in ways that we have described, and GTMA members themselves serve in their industry and communities. You can go into any town where there are textile or carpet plants and you will not be able to find an organization where people in the textile and carpet industry are not serving, be it in elected positions, in churches or civic organizations.

Bowen: That theme puts the spotlight on the rich heritage of leadership and service that both the association and its members provide. This industry is highly regarded in terms of its leadership. For instance, the industry has been widely recognized for its leadership in environment stewardship, in safety, in product quality and in innovation. Leadership and service are what this association is all about and it’s what our member companies are all about.

STN: You have assembled quite a diverse lineup of speakers for your annual meeting, including Springs CEO and Chairman Crandall Bowles, along with U.S. House Rep. Charlie Norwood (R-GA), Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue and Chick-fil-A founder Truett Cathy. What do you hope will be the key take-aways?

Gardner: Each of these speakers certainly has information and ideas that will benefit our members. They will be very informative and entertaining with these unique insights in successful leadership.

Bowen: We’re hoping that these speakers will provide insight into the very distinctive and successful styles of leadership and service to the community, to the state, to the country and to the corporate world.

We’re also going to have one of the foremost experts on China in Dr. Bill Fischer, who will comment on its politics, its culture and its economy. That’s important information, particularly with 2005 (when textile and apparel quotas are dropped) looming.

In Charlie Norwood, there has not been a more outspoken advocate in Congress for the interests of the textile industry.

Truett Cathy has been remarkably successful with his company, which was built on a real solid base of ethics.

Dr. Ken Breeden, the commissioner of the Department of Technical and Adult Education, oversees the state’s system of 34 technical colleges. I don’t think there’s a textile or carpet facility in this state that doesn’t have a good, close working relationship with their technical college.

And of course Crandall Bowles is one of the most successful business executives in the industry today. We will get her perspective on the essence of leadership.

STN: Anything I’ve failed to ask either of you that you’d like to comment on?

Bowen: Yes. We have a good, strong relationship with the Carpet and Rug Institute. We have a shared membership to some degree and that benefits the membership of both organizations. Whereas GTMA’s focus is on state legislative and regulatory matters of importance to the industry, CRI’s focus is more on federal issues than state issues outside of Georgia.

Werner Braun has been a terrific associate to work with, as has John Miller.

Another thing that has enabled GTMA to be successful is this industry’s support for our textile industry Political Action Committee. It enables GTMA to be recognized as a financial participant in the political process. We’re recognized for supporting candidates for elective offices who support our viewpoints and support pro-business legislation in general. I couldn’t be more pleased by the level of participation in our PAC. It’s very, very important to our overall mission in terms of representing the industry in the governmental and regulatory areas.

U.S.-Vietnam reach accord on quotas

April 28, 2003

After protracted negotiations, the U.S. and Vietnam reached a deal that places a cap on Vietnam textile and apparel imports, U.S. officials announced April 26.

The total value of these goods from Vietnam will be limited to about $1.65 billion. The deal, which goes into effect on May 1 and tentatively ends on Dec. 31, 2004, puts quotas on 38 textile and apparel categories. The quotas will increase 7 percent per year, with the exception of wool products, which will be restricted to 2 percent. The deal could continue on an annual basis until Vietnam joins the World Trade Organization.

“The agreement brings Vietnam into the global textile trading system, for as long at least as worldwide textile quotas are around,” U.S. trade official David Spooner said in a teleconference.

The deal is aimed at harnassing the surge of shipments from Vietnam in the last 18 months, U.S. officials said. Vietnam textile and apparel imports soared from $49 million in 2001 to $952 million last year, with growth rates in some categories of garments surging more than 1,000 percent.

The agreement also allows Vietnam factories to be inspected by U.S. Customs agents to verify production claims and to ensure that international labor standards are being met.

Briefs

Springs signs deal for
Egyptian cotton trademarks

April 28, 2003

FORT MILL, SC — Springs Industries, Inc., announced April 17 that it has signed an agreement to use the Egyptian cotton trademarked logo on product packaging, point-of-purchase material and other initiatives to promote the use of 100 percent Egyptian cotton in its home furnishings.

Springs signed a licensing agreement with the Egyptian Ministry of Economy and Foreign Trade, and the Alexandria Cotton Exports Association, also known as ALCOTEXA, which manages use of the trademark.

In other Springs-related news, D. Lindsay Pettus, president of the Katawba Valley Land Trust, announced that Springs Industries has donated a conservation easement to the group. Through the easement, the company will preserve a 100-foot buffer along the north bank of Cane Creek in Lancaster County, SC, for a distance of 4,030 feet eastward from near its confluence with the Catawba River. The easement will include a total of 9.3 acres of land.

“Springs has long been a responsible steward of the environment, and this gift of a conservation easement is another example of their corporate citizenship,” Pettus said.

Russell Corp. inks pact to buy Spalding Sports

ATLANTA — Russell Corporation announced April 17 that it has signed an agreement to acquire the brand names, inventory, contracts and related assets of the sporting goods business of Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc. for $65 million.

Spalding is a leading producer and marketer of basketballs, volleyballs, footballs and soccer balls under the Spalding brand name and of softballs under the Dudley brand.

This agreement covers ownership of the Spalding and Dudley names for all products. It also includes Sherrin, a brand of Australian rules football equipment, and contracts with more than 60 licensees around the world for apparel, shoes, sporting goods and related products. Russell is not acquiring the existing golf business that is sold under different brand names.

“This acquisition will expand Russell’s position as an athletic company,” said Jack Ward, chairman and CEO of Russell Corporation.

Russell has hired Scott Creelman to serve as president of the Spalding. He was with Spalding Sports Worldwide for 26 years and has been a consultant in the sporting goods industry since 2000.

Russell plans to open an office in the Springfield-Chicopee area of Massachusetts, with about 40 employees at that location.

The proposed acquisition continues Russell’s expansion in the sports, outdoors and athletic markets. Russell acquired Moving Comfort last year and Bike Athletic Company earlier this year.

Meanwhile, Jacada Ltd., a provider of legacy integration and web-to-host solutions,

announced that Russell Corp. has selected Jacada to enhance the usability of and access to its legacy applications.

Russell will use Jacada’s suite of legacy integration and web-enabling products to accomplish key objectives, including Web-enabling their order entry application to improve access and user-friendliness.

In addition, Russell Athletic, the flagship brand of Russell Corporation, unveiled a new integrated communications and advertising campaign entitled “Are You Russell Material?” today.

WestPoint orders recall of blankets

WEST POINT, GA — WestPoint Stevens, Inc. announced a voluntary recall of its Vellux® Fahrenheit™ heated blankets. The recall was initiated after the company received 10 reports from consumers of overheating and consequent scorching of the blanket and other bedding in contact with the blanket.

Mississippi Sportswear plans expansion

KOSCIUSKO, MS — Mississippi Sportswear, a niche athletic apparel maker owned by Ohio-based Betlin, Inc., said it is expanding by 10,000 square feet and adding 10 to 20 employees over the next year.

The company made the announcement after signing a licensing agreement with Adidas America, which includes both manufacturing and marketing and may involve three product lines.

Mississippi Sportswear produces the Athletix and MSports brands of athletic uniforms and CheerKids cheerleading apparel.

The expansion will bring its manufacturing facility to 45,000 square feet. The company

employs about 160 people during peak production.

Pillowtex re-launches new line of Cannon

KANNAPOLIS, NC — The Cannon brand, a widely recognized brand in home fashions, re-launched at the recent Home Fashions Market Week an innovative new line for the bedroom and bathroom that is expected to be available in major retail outlets this fall.

After more than a decade of relative quiet, the brand has invested significant resources in consumer research and product development, resulting in a line based on valuable consumer and customer feedback and more than 100 years of American tradition.

Mohawk receives Evergreen Award

PHILADELPHIA — The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) announced the presentation of the GSA Evergreen Award to Mohawk Industries of Kennesaw, GA.

This annual award recognizes the efforts of GSA corporate partners for their efforts in recycling, identifying environmentally preferable products and waste reduction.

Shaw Rugs acquires Georgia Tufters

DALTON, GA — Shaw Rugs, a manufacturer of area rugs, has acquired bath and accent rug and top-of-the-bed manufacturer Georgia Tufters.

Georgia Tufters, bought from majority owners Jeff and Fredrick Brown, will maintain operations at its headquarters in Calhoun, GA.

Closings, layoffs

April 28, 2003

Unifi to cut 400 more jobs

GREENSBORO, NC — As a cost-cutting measure, textured yarn producer Unifi Inc. said it is trimming its work force by another 400 people.

The company, which earlier had eliminated 200 positions through attrition since January, said the 600 layoffs represent about 15 percent of its U.S.-based work force.

The reductions will affect every North American facility.

Flynt Fabrics plans to close doors in May

GRAHAM, NC — Flynt Fabrics, which filed for bankruptcy in January, said it will shut down by the first week of May, putting 235 people out of work.

“It’s customers sourcing in China and other parts of the world at costs we cannot compete with,” company founder Charles H. Flynt Jr. told the Associated Press.

WestPoint to shut Rosemary Complex

WEST POINT, GA — WestPoint Stevens announced that it will permanently close the remainder of its Roanoke Rapids, NC, Rosemary Complex as it adjusts its business plan to address current economic projections.

About 230 employees will be affected.

Gold Toe closing N. Carolina plant

NEWTON, NC — Gold Toe of Burlington, NC, will shut down its sock-making factory here by July, putting about 290 more Catawba County employees out of work.

The company is consolidating operations at plants in Burlington and moving other jobs to Mexico.

Karastan Rug Mill to reduce work force

EDEN, NC — Karastan Rug Mill said it will eliminate about 45 hourly, clerical and supervisory jobs in the oriental designed rug portion of its operation.

The company blamed the move on declining sales.

Textile museum lays off staffers

LOWELL, MA — The American Textile History Museum (ATHM) has laid off seven full-time workers and one part-timer since December, according to The Lowell Sun.

The move, which the museum blamed on the slow economy and its impact on its invested endowment, is expected to save the museum about $130,000 this year, according to the newspaper.

Pickin' Cotton

April 28, 2003

Increasing global demand,
tight stocks support prices

By Odyll Santos

The cotton market has had its share of dips and declines, but these days, observers believe the trend is upward. Government data continue to show increasing world cotton usage and lower supplies, which are expected to lead the cotton market higher.

In its April supply/demand report, USDA raised its projection of total 2002-03 world cotton use to 97.8 million 480-pound bales from 97.07 million in March. With higher usage and total output cut to 87.84 million bales from nearly 88 million in March, the projection for world ending stocks declined to 36.62 million from 37.57 million.

Mississippi cotton marketing expert O.A. Cleveland said the figures point to “ever-increasing cotton demand in a market that has been demand-driven all year.” Most notable is the level of carryover stocks, which has been decreasing as cotton use expands around the globe.

“While nearly 20 percent of the world’s carryover stocks are held in the U.S., the U.S. stocks-to-use ratio remains constructive to the market as it is only slightly above 34 percent,” Cleveland said. “However, led by the explosion in foreign demand for U.S. cotton, the more important foreign stocks-to-use ratio is below 34 percent. Couple this with the near disappearance of quality cotton, and prices are well supported to trend higher.”

He noted that the limited availability of foreign stocks has provided excellent price support for the July and December cotton futures contracts traded in the New York Board of Trade.

With expectations of high demand, the July contract stayed close to 60 cents per pound the week ended April 11. July broke through the following week, rising to levels near its lifetime high of 60.90c on April 17, the last day of trading before the Easter holiday weekend. December rose to its contract high of 62.30c and is expected to challenge 63.00c. Market gains of 3.00c are possible amid nervousness over supplies. The 2003-04 crop still is to be planted, and weather and other problems could affect it.

Strong upland cotton exports have helped futures prices. USDA’s April 17 export report, reflecting activity for the week ended April 10, showed net sales of 220,300 running bales of upland varieties, 45 percent above the previous week’s level, but 22 percent under the four-week average. Upland shipments for that week totaled 351,600 running bales, 2 percent below the previous week’s marketing-year high, but 14 percent above the four-week average. Those shipments included 117,200 running bales destined for China, 54,900 to Turkey, 41,200 to Mexico, 26,000 to Indonesia and notable amounts going Pakistan, India and Taiwan.

USDA currently expects the U.S. to export 10.8 million 480-pound bales, or about 10.4 million running bales, of upland and pima cotton in the current marketing-year, which ends July 31. Combined sales commitments of both kinds of cotton are at about 11.4 million 480-pound bales, or 10.94 million running bales, as of April 10. That has prompted some market watchers to predict that USDA will raise its projection for 2002-03 U.S. exports.

“There are not many doubters left concerning the U.S. ability to reach the current forecast,” said trader Mike Stevens of Swiss Financial Services in Mandeville, LA, in market comments on-line before the start of post-holiday trading. “Another week of robust sales and port-jamming shipments should increase the chances of an upward adjustment by USDA on the May report.”

Still, there are some concerns despite significant indications of strong demand. The pneumonia-like virus SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, may affect cotton use in Asia.

Speaking to a reporter from the news wire Reuters in New York earlier this month, influential merchant William B. Dunavant Jr., chairman and chief executive of Dunavant Enterprises of Memphis, TN, said cotton markets could be hurt if Asian shoppers remain at home to avoid being exposed to the disease. Demand for cotton goods likely would fall, leading to a decline in cotton consumption by Asian textile mills.

Observers have been concerned particularly about China, a major cotton consumer and a leading buyer of U.S. growths. USDA data show that in 2001-02, China imported 450,000 480-pound bales of cotton for its mills, which consumed a total of 26 million bales. This season, China is expected to consume 28 million bales, with 2.6 million to be purchased from foreign sources.

Editorial

April 28, 2003

Same ol’ Vietnam

GOOD MORNING, Vietna-a-a-a-am!

Today, more than 80 million Vietnamese people will wake up:

• under the same communist regime that has suppressed and persecuted them for decades;

• the same ruthless leadership that plunged them into a war with the U.S., leading to more than 3 million military and civilian Vietnamese casualties;

• the same barbaric command that left ugly scars on America in the form of 58,000 dead and 150,000 wounded U.S. soldiers;

• the same inhumane powers that oversaw the torture of thousands of American servicemen at the Hanoi Hilton; and

• the same oppressive tyrants who today are enjoying a trade agreement giving Vietnam access to the U.S. market.

In December 2001, the U.S. normalized trade relations with Vietnam, and you know what happened next to the domestic textile industry: Shipments of textile and apparel products to the U.S. totaled $952 million last year and already was up to $530 million this year. Such a surge enabled Vietnam to become the sixth largest textile and apparel supplier to the U.S. market. Not bad for a country — communist at that — that isn’t even a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Sure, the U.S. has developed relationships with other former enemies such as WWII foes Germany, Italy and Japan. But the rulers of those countries were defeated and deposed and, as a result, those countries were democratized. But having normalized ties with an unchanged Vietnam just doesn’t “feel” right.

ON APRIL 28, the U.S. and Vietnam reached a bilateral trade agreement after two weeks of extensive negotiations. The good news: the deal sets quotas on Vietnam textile and apparel exports to the U.S. The bad news: Vietnam is still allowed to ship $1.65 billion worth of textiles and clothing to the U.S. this year, rolling over annually after December 2004, unless Vietnam becomes a member of the WTO. Next year, the cap is scheduled to rise by 7 percent on cotton products and 2 percent on wool products.

The deal was signed even after evidence emerged that some apparel imports labeled as Vietnamese were actually produced in China. And it was signed despite calls by the American Textile Manufacturers Institute, the National Cotton Council of America and the American Manufacturing Trade Action Coalition to forestall talks until the extent of illegal transshipments by China through Vietnam could be reviewed. Given these findings of transshipment, plus the fact that the domestic textile industry lost nearly $200 million in the fourth quarter and laid off nearly 3,000 workers last month, ATMI President Parks Shackelford said the two sides appeared to be negotiating an agreement that was “built on a hill of sand.”

FOR WHAT it’s worth, the U.S. textile lobby was battling formidable foes — U.S. retailers and importers, the Vietnam government and foreign investors in Vietnam’s textile manufacturing infrastructure. Interestingly, none of those parties appear particularly thrilled with the deal, either, which may indicate that the best workable plan for all sides was negotiated.

Even with quotas, though, the agreement with the communists undermines deals the U.S. has in place with Mexico, the Caribbean, Africa and Central America that allows duty-free access for apparel that uses U.S. yarn and fabric. The negotiated limits, accepted by the Vietnamese under the threat that even stiffer quotas would be imposed unilaterally, will hold Vietnam’s textile and apparel imports to the U.S. in check — they were targeted to have exceeded $2.4 billion this year — but the Vietnam quotaless experience may forebode a dire future for U.S. textiles, post-2005.

If so, could that mean, “good night, U.S. textiles?”

Textile News Index